Last edited by Dushicage
Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

1 edition of Natural progression of aortic stenosis in a veteran population found in the catalog.

Natural progression of aortic stenosis in a veteran population

by Marjory Alabre

  • 226 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by s.n.] in [New Haven, Conn .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Medicine

  • Edition Notes

    Thesis (M.D.) - Yale University, 1998.

    StatementMarjory Alabre
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 60 leaves ;
    Number of Pages60
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26389211M
    OCLC/WorldCa689666590

    INTRODUCTION. Aortic valve stenosis (aortic stenosis [AS]) is the most common cause of left ventricular outflow obstruction in children and adults; less common causes are subvalvular or supravalvular disease (table 1). The epidemiology and natural history of AS will be reviewed here. The clinical features, diagnosis, evaluation, medical therapy, percutaneous aortic valvotomy, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and surgical aortic valve replacement .   Whether patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) die because of AS-related causes is an important issue for the management of these patients. We Cited by:

    Books contributed by the Cushing-Whitney Medical Library, Yale University Natural progression of aortic stenosis in a veteran population. by Alabre, Marjory. texts. eye 34 favorite 0 Cushing-Whitney Medical Library. Created on. October 3 gingerbisharat Member.   Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease in developed countries, and its prevalence is increasing with aging of the population.1, 2 Several long‐term follow‐up series3, 4, 5 have now clearly defined the diagnosis and management of severe AS, and guidelines have now been established.6, 7 However, moderate AS (MAS) has not been extensively studied and Cited by: 4.

    Aortic stenosis is a type of heart valve disease. Your doctor may classify it as mild, moderate, or severe. Which stage you have depends on how damaged your aortic valve is and the amount of blood.   AORTIC VALVE thickening (AVT) without aortic stenosis (AS) is a common echocardiographic finding. Its prevalence is 26% in adults older than 65 years 1 and up to 40% in those older than 75 years. 2 In an echocardiographic study of nonagenarians, only 10% had a normal aortic valve. 3 The fact that the majority of elderly people do not have AVT implies that risk factors other Cited by:


Share this book
You might also like
Income averaging

Income averaging

Periodontal disease

Periodontal disease

The War Schools of Dobrinja

The War Schools of Dobrinja

2000 Import and Export Market for Glycosides, Glands, and Extracts in St. Kitts and Nevis

2000 Import and Export Market for Glycosides, Glands, and Extracts in St. Kitts and Nevis

Savannah revisited

Savannah revisited

Showing Up for Life

Showing Up for Life

Financial performance of chemical and allied products

Financial performance of chemical and allied products

Five studies in Japanese politics.

Five studies in Japanese politics.

menageries.

menageries.

bloom of Monticello

bloom of Monticello

alien land

alien land

Learning Fundamentals

Learning Fundamentals

To Her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales, with the tragedy of Cato, Nov. 1714. To Sir Godfrey Kneller, on his picture of the King

To Her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales, with the tragedy of Cato, Nov. 1714. To Sir Godfrey Kneller, on his picture of the King

Natural progression of aortic stenosis in a veteran population by Marjory Alabre Download PDF EPUB FB2

The natural history of moderate aortic stenosis in a veteran population Poornima Yechoor, BA, Alvin S. Blaustein, MD, Faisal G. Bakaeen, MD, Lorraine D.

Cornwell, MD, Joseph S. Coselli, MD, Scott A. LeMaire, MD, and Danny Chu, MD Objective: Our objective was to evaluate the natural history of moderate aortic stenosis in veterans—a unique patient population with significant comorbidities.

Our objective was to evaluate the natural history of moderate aortic stenosis in veterans—a unique patient population with significant comorbidities. The natural history of moderate aortic stenosis in a veteran population - The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular SurgeryCited by: 4. Acquired cardiovascular diseaseThe natural history of moderate aortic stenosis in a veteran population.

The natural history of moderate aortic stenosis in a veteran population. Presented at the 7th Annual Academic Surgical Congress, Las Vegas, Nevada, FebruaryAuthor links open overlay by: 4. of surgical versus medical treatment of severe Natural progression of aortic stenosis in a veteran population book stenosis and evaluated associated patient survival.

Methods. We retrospectively reviewed data from all patients diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis at a Veter-ans Affairs medical facility between January and April Results. Of patients with severe aortic stenosis, Of patients with severe aortic stenosis, (75%) underwent surgical evaluation, and (59%) underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR).

The patient's decision to decline surgical referral or AVR (n = 47) and severe comorbidities (n = 34) were the top two reasons for medical treatment rather than by: Progression of Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis.

The progression of aortic disease in the LGAS group was slower by AVA but higher by MG than in the non-LGAS group (− ± vs − ± cm 2 and ± 9 vs ± mmHg, respectively; P Cited by: 1. One of the challenges in clinical cardiology is to determine the optimal time of valve replacement surgery in patients with aortic stenosis.

To meet this challenge, one requires an accurate knowledge of the natural history and rate of progression of the disease. This review will summarize the natural history of aortic stenosis in terms of symptoms, mortality, and stenosis by: Background—The risk factors affecting aortic stenosis (AS) progression are not clearly ts into this may allow for its secondary prevention.

Methods and Results—We investigated predictors of AS progression in consecutive patients with AS who had paired echocardiograms ≥3 months (23±11) s clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical variables were related to Cited by: Rapid progression of aortic jet velocities can be detected by closer follow-ups and is accepted as a marker for high risk patients [35].

Cardiac and non-cardiac mortality is significantly. Finally, a more rapid rate of aortic stenosis progression is observed in elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and chronic renal insufficiency. Although there is no definitive rate of aortic stenosis progression across the entire patient community, I hope this information offers some insight into this topic.

We retrospectively reviewed data from all patients diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis at a Veterans Affairs medical facility between January and April Results Of patients with severe aortic stenosis, (75%) underwent surgical evaluation, and (59%) underwent aortic Cited by:   The normal progression of aortic stenosis is from mild to moderate to severe.

Question #4: What are the signs or symptoms when my aortic stenosis worsens, and what do I need to be aware of. The significant symptoms of aortic stenosis are: 1) Shortness of breath. 2) Chest discomfort or anginal symptoms similar to coronary artery disease.

We have demonstrated that in patients with severe aortic stenosis, the presence of a calcified aortic valve, combined with rapid hemodynamic progression, identifies a high-risk population in whom early elective surgery may be considered. 5 Peak aortic jet velocity, which is a marker of disease severity, has been shown to be an important predictor of outcome with incrementally higher event Cited by: the likelihood that the aortic stenosis is due to calcific degeneration of the tricuspid aortic valve.

In individuals aged 70 years and o l d e r, this condition accounts for about half of all cases of aortic stenosis. Because even among octogenarians the overall pre v a l e n c e of aortic stenosis is about 20%,1 t h e r e must.

Citation Nr: Decision Date: 12/27/18 Archive Date: 12/27/18 DOCKET NO. DATE: Decem REMANDED Entitlement to an aortic valve disorder (to include aortic stenosis) as secondary to a service-connected disability is remanded. REASONS FOR REMAND The Veteran served on active duty from February to January This matter comes before.

Progression of aortic stenosis. About 50% of these patients with mild to moderate stenosis at baseline had progressive valve calcification leading to haemodynamically severe aortic stenosis (defined as an aortic jet velocity >m/s) and 18% required valve replacement for onset of aortic stenosis by:   We have an elderly family member who was diagnosed with aortic stenosis in His heart was evaluated again last year and the measurement of the valve was around 1cm.

Last year he began having fainting episodes and ended up in the hospital twice as a result of injuries from the fall. At that time he also told the doctors that he has been having chest pain.

This is a PDF-only article. The first page of the PDF of this article appears by: A Health Care Professional’s Guide Aortic Stenosis in Seniors With highlights from the ACC/AHA practice guidelines for valve disease Aortic stenosis (AS) is primarily caused by calcification of the aortic valve (calcific AS), which is increasingly seen with age.

Calcific AS is an active disease process with many similarities. Aortic stenosis affects 3% of persons older than 65 years. Although survival in asymptomatic patients is comparable to that in age- and sex-matched control patients, it decreases rapidly after.

Natural history and treatment of aortic stenosis 1. NATURAL HISTORY AND TREATMENT OF AORTIC STENOSIS 29/FEB/ 2. AORTIC JET VELOCITY (m/sec) MEAN GRADIENT (mm Hg) VALVE AREA (cm2) NORMAL MODERATE SEVERE > >40 >knowledge of the natural history and rate of progression of the disease.

calcification and our patient population is older and has more associated coronary artery disease,l 7,18 identify reliable predictors to the rate of progression of aortic stenosis, then surgical consideration may be.The natural history of severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis has been well documented.

However, the natural history of moderate aortic stenosis remains poorly understood. Therefore, a group of 66 patients was identified who had adiagnosis of moderate aortic stenosis at the time ofcardiac catheterization (aortic valve area to cm2Cited by: